Mareograph
2018
Site-specific installation including custom made tide gauge, sediment, stoneware cylinder

Mareograph is a two-part project in Bergen which explore marine environments and how the sea adapts to the various gravitational interactions of the earth, the moon and the sun. The project is based on the Bergen City Council’s risk assessment of the seriously polluted marine environments in Puddefjorden and Store Lungegårdsvann in Bergen. This risk assessment has shown that the sea bed has a very high content of heavy metals and organic pollutants which now form the basis for the Council’s extensive clean-up work on the sea bed in the fjord.

An analog mareograph (tide gauge) placed by the fjord registers the tidewater dynamics in rotating stoneware cylinders treated with a layer of sediment isolated out from various parts of the fjord. The cylinders, which are continuously replaced during the exhibition period, will later be dried and fired ceramically, such that the clay with the specific composition of the sediment sinters* and a glaze with a unique appearance is formed.

The first part of the project shows the mareograph station placed on the Årstad quay at the conduit between the inner Puddefjord and the lake Store Lungegårdsvannet in Bergen. The second part of the project is a thematically related seminar and a presentation of the ceramically fired measurement cylinders.

*Sintering is a process whereby powder or mineral material is hardened into a compacted solid (sinter) by heating to temperatures at which the particles begin to react and melt together. (Source: Store Norske leksikon, https://snl.no/sintring)

Mareograph is a commissioned work for Volt, curated by Marie Nerland. The work was developed in dialogue with the Department of Earth Science and Earth Surface Sediment Laboratory (EARTHLAB) at the Universitety of Bergen and Cowi AS.

160x90x130cm
Photo by Cecilia Jonsson

160x90x130cm
Photo by Bjarte Bjørkum

160x90x130cm
Photo by Thor Brødreskift

160x90x130cm
Photo by Bjarte Bjørkum

Stoneware cylinder 50x10cm ø
Photo by Bjarte Bjørkum